Home  >  Engagement   >   Where is the Consumer in Vendors’ HIE Solutions?

Where is the Consumer in Vendors’ HIE Solutions?

by John Moore | June 30, 2010

In Monday’s post, Chilmark reflected upon a piece that Peter Hudson, co-founder of Healthagen, the developers of mHealth app iTriage wrote for mobihealthnews. In that article, Peter talked about the utility of an mHealth-based PHR (iTriage recently launched such capabilities), but in our post, we countered that today, it is still far too difficult for a consumer to pull together their personal health information (PHI) to create a truly longitudinal record. This will likely stunt the efforts of companies such as Healthagen who are trying to offer consumers a PHR – the hassle factor is still far too great to overcome.

Now we will look at the red hot space of Health Information Exchanges (HIEs).

As local, regional or even statewide aggregators and distributors of health data to facilitate care coordination, HIEs have the potential to play a pivotal role in helping a consumer create and manage their PHI. Now that does not mean that the HIE has to offer the consumer a PHR per se, but what an HIE may be able to do is offer the consumer an ability to have a portal view into their PHI that resides within the context of a given HIE. Better yet, why not have as a condition of receiving some of that federal largesse of $564M for state HIE programs that these HIEs support “Blue Button” functionality allowing a consumer to readily download or export their PHI to wherever the consumer desires.

Ah, but we digress.

The purpose of this post is to extract a couple of data points from our forthcoming HIE report as they pertain to consumer engagement. Unfortunately, it is not a pretty picture.

As part of our market survey of twenty HIE vendors, we asked them a number of questions with regards to what consumer-centric capabilities did their HIE solution support. Fully eighty percent of those interviewed had either modest (15%) or weak (65%) consumer offerings.

The following table provides a brief snapshot of those HIE vendors that have what Chilmark considers strong consumer engagement tools. Two of those vendors, Kryptiq and MEDSEEK are somewhat difficult to classify as an HIE in the traditional sense, thus you will not find them running under the covers at your local RHIO. Microsoft is still new to the HIE market with one HIE live in Milwaukee and another in D.C.. While Microsoft’s platform offers these HIEs the potential for bi-directional communication with HealthVault, that capability, to the best of our knowledge has not been tested at either of these HIEs. Also, it is important to note that the Microsoft HIE solution offers little with regards to support for transactional processes (appointment scheduling, Rx refill, eVisit, etc.). RelayHealth is the remaining HIE vendor that actually has some of the more robust consumer tools in the market (they received fairly high ratings in our previous iPHR Market Report), so this is not too much of a surprise.

Now it is not necessarily the fault of laggard HIE vendors that today, their solutions offer weak consumer tools. Frankly, the market has not asked for them. Even as recently as last year when the various HIT policy committees were meeting in Washington to set policies for the HITECH Act and the funding to come, the committee on HIEs, in one of their seminal meetings, completely ignored the consumer role in an HIE. Shameful.

But this will change in due time. MEDecision and Carefx are building out their consumer-facing capabilities and we are sure others will add consumer functionality in time, most likely via partnerships or an occassional acquisition as market is moving too fast for an internal build-out. in the meantime, those vendors that have this capability bring to market competitive differentiation.

While this is all well and good, another development is also taking place, NHIN Direct – something that Microsoft’s chief architect, Sean Nolan mentioned in his comment to our Monday post. What role might a secure, lightweight communication system play within the broader context of HIEs, aggregated PHI, consumer access and potentially control of their PHI? A lot of questions to ponder that we will be looking into further over the next few days

Stay up to the minute.

“As biometric data becomes cheaper and easier to collect through smart sensors, devices, and mobile apps, expect to see more innovations in consumer health.”

-Alicia Vergaras